Co-Curricular Activities

Our weekly Co-Curricular activities have three objectives: to build community, to build academic skills, and to enhance course material. They include film screenings, academic workshops, field trips, guest speakers, and more. Here is a partial list of some of our past Co-Curricular activities. Please note: the Popular Culture stream will not be offered in 2017-2018.

CO-CURRICULARS

Order & Disorder

Careers In and Around the Law Panel     

IMG-20160211-WA0006Many of our Order and Disorder students are thinking about law school, or careers pertaining to law and government. Through student feedback, we learned that they were eager to hear from current professionals regarding their journey and any advice they may have about their undergraduate studies and/or graduate school. We invited Toronto City Councillor Mary Fragedakis, Caitlyn Kasper, Dr. Trish McMahon, Naseem Mithoowani, and our own Professor Kerry Taylor to participate in our Careers In and Around the Law Panel, which was facilitated by Candice Stoliker, Woodsworth College’s Embedded Career Educator.


Trip to the Royal Ontario Museum

IMG_9131Woodsworth College is located just a few minutes away from the Royal Ontario Museum, which boasts state-of-the-art galleries and exhibitions. As part of their discussion about innovation and social change, the students in the Order & Disorder stream recently visited the First Nations Exhibit at the ROM.  They looked for evidence of technological innovation, and considered its impact on both indigenous and European communities. In addition, students identified the many ways in which societies record and explain the past. 


What Should I Major In? Panel Discussions

20160315_141005

U of T students select their majors  (“Programs”) in April of their first year. For some, this can be a daunting decision. Therefore, the Order and Disorder stream hosts three workshops in which faculty and upper-year students from various programs around campus meet with our students to provide advice. Students learn about majors such as Political Science, Sociology, Criminology, and History,  as well as programs they might not have known about, such as Ethics, Society & Law, International Relations, Human Geography, and Peace, Conflict & Justice. 


 

Surviving Progress Documentary Film Screening

Surviving Progress

“Every time history repeats itself the price goes up.”

Surviving Progress presents the story of human advancement as awe-inspiring and double-edged. It reveals the grave risk of running the 21st century’s software — our know-how — on the ancient hardware of our primate brain which hasn’t been upgraded in 50,000 years. With rich imagery and immersive soundtrack, filmmakers Mathieu Roy and Harold Crooks launch us on journey to contemplate our evolution from cave-dwellers to space explorers. Read more here.

After viewing the film Woodsworth One students considered questions like: What do we mean by “progress”? How did our understanding of “progress” change during the Industrial Revolution, and what impact has that had on contemporary society? How might we re-imagine “progress”? You can watch the trailer here.

 


Visit to the Ontario Legislative Assembly at Queen’s Park

LegislativeMany Woodsworth One students are interested in pursuing programs in Criminology, International Relations, Political Science, and Law.

We had a guided tour of the Ontario Legislative Assembly, where students visited the chamber and key offices. We had the opportunity to ask questions about pending legislation, the process of passing bills into law, and traditions and etiquette.

Our students were invited back to sit in on the Legislative Question Period, which will be one of our spring activities.


Field Trip to the Historic Distillery District

DistilleryThe Distillery District is a national Historic Site with an incredibly rich history. The site was once The Gooderham and Worts Distillery, and represents the largest and best preserved collection of Victorian Industrial Architecture in North America.

In its time, The Gooderham and Worts Distillery played an important role in the growth and wealth of both the city and nation. In addition to various involvements in real estate and banking, the company at one time contributed more to Federal coffers than any other enterprise in the country.

The Historic Toronto Distillery District provided an excellent opportunity for our students to explore how social order arose during the early foundations of what is now the City of Toronto. Exploring topics such as early immigration, working conditions, ethnic enclaves, and the impact of the Industrial Revolution, our students were able to see the present consequences of past events.


Library Scavenger Hunt

LibraryThe University Toronto library system includes 44 libraries across three campuses, boasting an enormous catalogue of books, maps,archives, journals, magazines, newspapers — not to mention their online and e-resources.It can be intimidating for a first year student to introduce themselves to this massive system, so this activity gave them a fun introduction!

Students were given a “cheat sheet” of libraries and collections around the UofT St. George campus, and were asked to go in groups to as many libraries as possible in one hour, collecting resources along the way. When they came back together as a group, we divided up materials, and had a UofT librarian explain the online catalogue system.

 


Olivia Chow Guest Lecture

Olivia ChowThe Woodsworth One Program was recently visited by MP Olivia Chow, who spoke to the cohort about the Idle No More Movement. Ms. Chow provided insight, through the lens of a member of parliament, on the movement and necessary action required by the government. The talk was followed by a Q & A session.


 

Essay Writing and Critical Reading Workshop

krugerhallGuests: Sandra Moffat, Learning Strategist
Brock MacDonald, Director, Academic Writing Centre

One of the greatest benefits of being enrolled in the Woodsworth One program is priority access to academic resources at Woodsworth College.

The College has a number of supports available to enhance students’ academic success in first year and beyond. Sandra Moffat, an in-house learning strategist, provided practical advice on how to tackle extensive reading requirements in Social Sciences and Humanities courses. Most students find it difficult to adjust to the volume of required readings for university courses, and Sandra showed them how to break it down into manageable and meaningful parts.

This workshop was followed up by an interactive session with Brock MacDonald of the Academic Writing Centre,  who shared valuable tips on successful academic writing. The Academic Writing Centre is available year-round for students to make appointments and have a professional review their written work before it’s submitted for various courses.


Workshop with Doctors Without Borders

DocsGuest: Fabien Schneider, former Head of Mission in France, Emergency Coordinator throughout Africa and current Program Unit Manager in Canada

Doctors Without Borders visited Woodsworth One. Students learned about the many challenges and needs faced by the non-governmental organization in situations of conflict, post conflict and natural disaster relief operations. The guest speaker presented the country profiles of Chad, Kenya, Honduras, and the Democratic Republic of Congo and students had to develop a logistical strategy for delivering emergency medical assistance, supplies, training and food following earthquakes, ethnic conflicts and wars.

 

 


Presentation by the Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program      

Inside and OutThe Inside-Out Prison Exchange Program offers a collaborative learning experience for individuals inside and outside of prison. The Inside-Out Program visited the Woodsworth One Program to give an overview of their program and how the program participants have learned from one another. This was a unique opportunity for Woodsworth One students to gain exposure to different learning communities as well as the value of  inside-outside of prison dialogue.

CO-CURRICULARS

Popular Culture

Field Trip: The Paris Posters

maiStudents will visit the E.J. Pratt Library on the Victoria University campus to view their Special Collections Exhibit of the “Paris Posters.” These are the original protest street art of the Paris Uprising of 1968 which were used as weapons in provoking political and social change.

Note: This Co-Curricular will be offered in the Winter 2017 term as part of WDW154H Popular Culture Today II: Protest and Popular Culture. To learn more about this course, please visit our Program Spotlight

“Art and Activism.” Guest Speaker: Lorraine Segato

ArtSpecial Guest Lorraine Segato, musician, songwriter, filmmaker, curator, and social justice activist, will show her film “QSW the Rebel Zone” and speak about art and activism in Toronto as well as the exhibit she curated on the same theme.

Note: This Co-Curricular will be offered in the Winter 2017 term as part of WDW154H Popular Culture Today II: Protest and Popular Culture. To learn more about this course, please visit our Program Spotlight

Field Trip: QSW: The Rebel Zone

QueenmStudents will plan to visit the Regent Park YTB Gallery to view the tentative remounting this spring of “QSW The Rebel Zone (1975-1989) Art & Activism: Ignites a Culture-Transforms a City,” a cultural artifact exhibit curated by Loraine Segato that documents Toronto’s underground movement for social change headquartered in the Queen Street West neighbourhood, the nerve center for leading edge art, music and ideas. queen2The exhibit was first mounted in the spring of 2016.

Note: This Co-Curricular will be offered in the Winter 2017 term as part of WDW154H Popular Culture Today II: Protest and Popular Culture. To learn more about this course, please visit our Program Spotlight

“Protests and Social Media.” Guest Speaker: Professor Alex Hana

protestProfessor Alex Hana from the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology at UTM will speak about how social media influences protest movements and will demonstrate the Machine-learning Protest Event Data System (MPEDS), a computer program that parses text for information about protest events.

Note: This Co-Curricular will be offered in the Winter 2017 term as part of WDW154H Popular Culture Today II: Protest and Popular Culture. To learn more about this course, please visit our Program Spotlight

“Signs and Symbols: The Language of Pop Culture.” Guest Speaker: Professor Lisa Peden

Hants holding up a peace symbolProfessor Lisa Peden, a semiotician from the Institute of Communication, Culture, Information and Technology at UTM, will conduct an interactive workshop on the application of semiotics to popular culture, especially regarding social protests.

Note: This Co-Curricular will be offered in the Winter 2017 term as part of WDW154H Popular Culture Today II: Protest and Popular Culture. To learn more about this course, please visit our Program Spotlight

“Omeka Workshop.” Guest Speaker: Professor Alexandra Bolintineanu

omekaStudents will visit the Instructional Lab in Gerstein Library where Professor Alexandra Bolintineanu, specialist in Digital Humanities, will introduce them to the use of Omeka software in the production of multi-media essays.

Note: This Co-Curricular will be offered in the Winter 2017 term as part of WDW154H Popular Culture Today II: Protest and Popular Culture. To learn more about this course, please visit our Program Spotlight

“Poster Workshop.”

posterStudents will receive instruction on how to produce an academic poster.

Note: This Co-Curricular will be offered in the Winter 2017 term as part of WDW154H Popular Culture Today II: Protest and Popular Culture. To learn more about this course, please visit our Program Spotlight

Talking Star Wars: The Force Awakens

Star Wars Awaken Promotional Poster
Kate Taylor, The Globe and Mail’s lead film reviewer, was appointed only a short time before the December 2015 premiere of Star Wars: The Force Awakens; reviewing the widely anticipated film was one of her first tasks in her new job. Taylor visited the Popular Culture Today I class on September 28, 2016. The conversation was primarily about The Force Awakens; Taylor explained her principles of reviewing and explained how they led her to neither wholly like nor wholly dislike the newest Star Wars film. She also reminisced about the Twitter storm unleashed when she gave a negative review to the animated film, Zootopia; the experience was one of several Taylor presented that showed the impact that the Internet and especially social media have had on film reviewing. Go to the website of The Globe and Mail (http://www.theglobeandmail.com/) to read her review of The Force Awakens. 
Note: Taylor’s lecture was a co-curricular event of the 2016-2017 academic year in Popular Culture Today I: Issues and Perspectives.

Toronto Art Exhibitions: Where Popular Culture Meets High Culture

Nuit_Blanche-Poster_10x20-FinalPhoto of WeeGeeVisits to Toronto art exhibitions were featured last year (2015-2016) in Popular Culture Today I: Issues and Perspectives co-curriculars. Early in the term, the class met and talked with Toronto-based artist Francisco-Fernando Granados at the site of his Nuit Blanche installation, “refugees run the seas” (far left), in advance of the annual all-night, citywide event on October 1, 2015. Granados describes the
installation as “a billboard project that draws and diverts from pop culture as a way to invite the viewer to imagine an incalculable future where justice for migrants exists”. Granados returned to discuss the relationship between popular culture and high culture in a September 2016 le
cture. For more on Granados, here is a link to his website: http://francisco-fernando-granados.blogspot.ca. Later in the term, students also toured the Ryerson University Image Centre’s exhibit, “WeeGee: Murder Is My Business”, which showed how New York photographer WeeGee (1899-1968) redefined photo journalism with his raw images of unscripted life in the streets. 
Note: Exhibition visits were done in the 2015-2016 academic year in Popular Culture Today I: Issues and Perspectives. The Granados class visit was on September 15, 2016).

U of T Grad Reads from His First Sci-Fi Novel

Cover of CashCrash JubileeEli K.P. William (U of T, 2009 with high distinction) read from his first novel, Cash Crash Jubilee (2015), the first in his science fiction Jubilee Cycle (Talos Press). The co-curricular visit was part of William’s first reading tour in Canada. Born and raised in Toronto, he currently works in Tokyo as a Japanese translator; in addition to his reading, William described how his studies in Japanese and creative writing at U of T led to his careers as writer and translator. For more information on William’s books, visit http://elikpwilliam.com/
Note: William’s co-curricular reading was presented in Popular Culture Today I: Issues and Perspectives, on September 29, 2016.

Some Kind of Monster Documentary Film Screening

220px-Some_kind_of_minster_(film)Some Kind of Monster (2004) is an up-close, in-depth portrait of one of the world’s most successful rock bands, Metallica, who have sold over 110 million records since their debut in 1982.  The film chronicles two years during which the band nearly broke up, struggling with personal differences (and in one member’s case, substance abuse problems) while trying to record their eighth album.  They were also dealing with backlash from many fans because of their role in shutting down Napster, the pioneering online file-sharing service.

Watching this documentary contributed to Popular Culture Today students’ exploration of the nature of pop music stardom, the relationship between pop stars and their audience, and the making of the music itself.  You can watch the trailer here.  

Note: This documentary was shown in the Popular Culture Today II: Studies in Popular Music, 2015-2016.